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Overview

Global warming affects us all and we all need to make changes to our lifestyles to reduce our carbon emissions. Changes can include using less electricity, reducing air travel, using public transport, and recycling. We can also plant trees to offset the impacts of emissions. This is because trees remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow. While forests can be established using both exotic and native tree species, there is increasing interest in New Zealand in planting native trees for their environmental, social and cultural benefits as well as their potential to store carbon. There are also opportunities for economic returns from native forests, albeit long term, e.g., by specialty timber production. Although early growth is slower for native than exotic species like pines and eucalypts, establishment and management of native forestry for carbon under the Government’s Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) can potentially provide an intermediate economic return.

Background references

  • Beets PN, Kimberley MO, Oliver GR, Pearce SH, Graham JD, Brandon AM. 2012. Allometric equations for estimating carbon stocks in natural forest in New Zealand. Forests 3: 818-839.
  • Bergin DO, Kimberley MO. 2012a. Performance of planted native conifers. Tāne’s Tree Trust Technical Handbook. Technical Article No. 10.2. 8p.
  • Bergin DO, Kimberley MO. 2012. Performance of planted native hardwood trees. Tāne’s Tree Trust Technical Handbook. Technical Article No. 10.3. 8p.
  • Bergin DO, Kimberley MO. 2012. Performance of planted native shrubs. Tāne’s Tree Trust Technical Handbook. Technical Article No. 10.4. 8p.
  • Kimberley MO, Bergin DO, Beets PN 2014. Carbon sequestration in planted native trees and shrubs. Tāne’s Tree Trust Technical Handbook. Technical Article No. 10.5. 12p.